Return to Content

Book Excerpt from The Price of Malice

by in Nov 2009
Book Excerpt from The Price of Malice
0 votes, 0.00 avg. rating (0% score)
Print Friendly

Price of MaliceRead more: Review by Tim Clark

From The Price of Malice, St. Martin’s/Minotaur, $24.99

Brattleboro is a standard hub town on one hand, and a quirky cultural oasis on the other. Housing some twelve thousand people by night, it swells considerably during the day, inflated by commuters from surrounding villages, including nearby New Hampshire and Massachusetts. But, in part because its three interstate exits are the first in a state famous for independent thinking, social activism is valued as one of the towns dearest assets. In the sixties, when both I-91 was being laid down and the counterculture was escaping the cities for visions of sylvan paradise, the combination of Vermont’s Bing Crosby beauty, its Ethan Allen outspokenness, and its sudden, easy access made it almost irresistible to a legion of urban dropouts.

[Joe Gunther] stood with the closed door to his back, motionless, surveying the single room.

It was an awful place — small, dark, foul, looking like the aftermath of a Kansas twister, minus the missing roof that would have only improved things. Instead, it felt like the den of some creature, custom-made from a child’s nightmare.

Slipping on a pair of latex gloves, Joe reached out and switched on the overhead light. A bare bulb hanging at the end of a wire illuminated the room’s center, casting an angular glare into all four corners. The single window was closed and covered with cardboard, duct-taped in place. The heat and stench made Joe’s nose tingle. He carefully removed his jacket and hung it on the doorknob, already feeling the sweat trickling between his shoulders blades and down the backs of his legs.

“Could you tell if Castine had only been there last night, or if he was using this place as a home away from home? I mean, for example, did you find his prints generally throughout the apartment, or mostly in his own blood?”

Lerner answered him. “I’d say the latter, but as you all know, fingerprints in general are a Hollywood obsession, where they’re the end-all, be-all. In a place like this, especially, where you have a different tenant every few months, and so many people coming and going anyhow, we don’t go crazy trying to catalog them. We collected what we thought made sense.”


Give the Gift of Yankee Magazine and get a Gift in Return!

Send a one-year gift subscription of Yankee Magazine for only $17.99 a 50% savings. In return we will send you a free 2016 Scenes of New England Calendar (a $9.95 value)!


No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

We reserve the right to remove or edit comments that are offensive or disrespectful to our readers and/or writers, cannot be verified, lack clarity, or contain profanity. Your comments may be republished by Yankee Magazine across multiple platforms.

Register Sign In

©2015, Yankee Publishing Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Yankee Publishing Inc., | P.O. Box 520, Dublin, NH 03444 | (603) 563-8111

< Prev

Four Poems by Paul Marion

All of the following poems can be found in Paul Marion's What is the City?, ...

Related Articles

Next >

Home Projects: Ski Chair

Chair's back is varying lengths of 42 to 45 inches cut from seven fiberglass skis. You'll need a power hacksaw to cut through metal edges. Armrests are two 26-inch ski sections (tips included). Chair's seat is cut ski scraps. Seven 20-inch strips are screwed into front and rear cross members.Read more: Ski Coatrack from ski blogger Heather Atwell Lincoln Fuller isn't big on getting rid ...

Related Articles