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Plimoth Plantation: An Interpreter's Tale

Plimoth Plantation: An Interpreter’s Tale
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A year ago a group of Laotian refugees were taken on a cultural excursion to the Plantation. The filmstrip and static exhibits were of little interest, but the Laotians brightened when they entered the village. They examined the fat sheep and pigs, sniffed the herbs, and touched the wooden houses reverently. As they were leaving, one of them politely asked, “Can we move here and make this our home?”

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One Response to Plimoth Plantation: An Interpreter’s Tale

  1. Alf & Diane Ripley November 6, 2008 at 1:07 pm #

    As always, I find any article about Plimouth Plantation to be very interesting. For years I have read everything I could about the saga of the Pilgrim fathers and their history. This and anything New England has fascinated me and for the longest time I couldn’t understand the reason for this. A couple years ago my son, who is very interested in our family’s geneology, came across any entry for my mothers side of the family (Hughes). This entry
    indicated that my great great great-grandmother was an Elizabeth Potter of Portsmouth, Rhode Island. It further indicated that Elizabeth’s great great great-grandfather was a man named George Soule, who it turns out, was a bonded servant to Edward Winslow and accompanied Winslow to the new world aboard the Mayflower in 1620. Soule was also a signer of the Mayflower Compact. This information more than confirmed, for me, the reason why I had this interest in early New England history. My son has also learned recently that Elizabeth Potter had another relative during this time which is of interest. His name was Roger Williams. And yes it is the same Roger Williams of Rhode Island fame. Completely and utterly fascinating for me. If I am correct William Bradford was from Yorkshire in England and the Ripley side of our family was from that area as well. They immigrated to Nova Scotia in 1774 during the Yorkshire Settlement of that time.
    I have been a subscriber to Yankee Magazine since October 1981 and it is story’s like Kathleen Kilgore’s about Plimouth Plantation that helps to keep me coming back.
    Great article!!

    regards,

    Alf Ripley

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