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Speaking My Mind: Should New Hampshire keep the first-in-the-nation primary?

Speaking My Mind: Should New Hampshire keep the first-in-the-nation primary?
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by in Nov 2007

Dorothy Nazarian — New Hampshire’s historical position of first in the nation primary should be fought for and held on…it’s not a partisan issue to be debated, but a matter of principle. In this heightened atmosphere of degrading political discourse, we should not forfeit what has been an accepted, acknowledged, and constitutionally required (NH Const.) position held by New Hampshire.

Rebecca Buccini — Do you consider your state a good cross section of the U.S.? If not, why is primary held in New Hampshire? Don’t know history. Second thought, why not New Hampshire? It’s as good a place as any even though your weather is not always so wonderful when it is held.

Bruce Berry — I believe the expression is…”as goes New Hampshire, so goes the nation.” The voters of New Hampshire are true, honest, and of high moral fiber. Let’s keep this tradition and dump the electoral college instead.

Richard Gillard — Absolutely. It is a huge point of recognition for the State of New Hampshire. Big for tourist recognition with all the media swarming over the state and each night on the major networks NH gets a lot of free publicity. While it is small, it is mighty in that many candidates fall out as a result of the primary. It has huge publicity value and an economic boon for the State. Besides, it is a lot of fun to watch.

Betty Hale — Somebody has to go first! Why not “the shire”! NH is more balanced than ever in terms of representing the rest of the country. We love the tradition of our first primary — and so does most of the country.

Mel Allen — In a political landscape where big money buys slick tv ads, New Hampshire is an exception. Here candidates cannot rely solely on ads and packaging — they actually have to face people every day, in living rooms, and diners, and in schools. They can’t duck questions. Their strengthe and weakness are revealed. The nation would lose if New Hampshire lost her role as first in the nation.

Ralph Worthington — The first time I ever voted I was teaching at Goffstown High School in New Hampshire. It was thrilling to me that NH had the nation’s first primary. I hope that it will continue that way.

Jewel McKenzie — The Northeast is steeped in history and well-known for speaking their mind. When NH speaks the US listens…why is that? Because New Englanders are grounded in the value of “…for the people, by the people.” It’s a reminder to the rest of the nation what we fought for in the beginning…a fair voice in the governing of our nation, stated simply by the votes of of the people from a state that declares “Live Free of Die.” Don’t take that away from our citizens!

Debbie Despres — Just because it has “always been” is not necessarily a good reason to keep the status quo. Why not let Vermont or Maine or some other state benefit from the attention of the first in the nation primary?

JulieAnn Perleoni — Everyone knows that New England has the highest rate of educated people. Besides, New Englanders are terrific judges of character and morality, skeptics at heart, New Hampshire should remain the first state in the nation for the primary.

Rachel Kipka — New Hampshire, for many years, has indicated the national “attitude” towards the candidates for our nation. I hope we keep it that way.

Norman Tellier — Definitely YES — I believe in the old adage as New Hampshire so goes the country.

TJ Meenan — Yes, make sure you keep it nice and early, but be sure and lean to the right when you do! Support our troops!

Brian Gibb — Since we’re the first in the state, I think we should keep our primaries, as is, first. Why change?

Rake Morgan — It must have been 20 years ago that I listened to a “Saturday Night Live” news commentator rant about New Hampshire’s first-in-the-nation primary status. To paraphrase, he wondered why the fate of the Union should be left to a bunch of “syrup-sucking squirrel watchers?” It was a good question. And very funny. I think I rolled off the sofa laughing so hard that I hurt my stomach.

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