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Call of the Wild: Loons

Call of the Wild: Loons
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On the last day of the holiday weekend, I hear a call of alarm from the pond. I run down to the dock. The male continues wailing. The female hovers close to the nest. He’s getting his break at last, I think, lowering the binoculars. Something catches my eye, and I raise the glasses just in time to see a fuzzy black chick the size and shape of a Ping-Pong ball tumble from the nest into the water.

I yell up to the house and Jim comes running down. “We have a chick!” I tell him. “We?” he asks.

I’m floating, along with the new parents. But I notice that they aren’t returning to the second egg. By the end of the day, it’s clear they’ve abandoned it. (The next day, Susie Burbidge will collect the egg for possible testing.) There will be no second chick.

That night, more wails and yodels jolt me out of bed. I stand at the open window, straining to hear. A lone bullfrog booms, then a whole chorus. I wonder, Do they eat loon chicks? I suddenly, viscerally, feel all the dangers ahead, the snapping turtles, bald eagles, lead fishing tackle. Three months before that little ball of fluff can feed itself fully, can fly.

Somewhere out in the dark, the loons are trying to protect their chick. I think, Your care is what stands between your baby and death. No one–nothing–will care as much as you do whether it survives or thrives. It occurs to me that a loon’s drive to establish territory is a proxy for the real attachment: The crucial bond is between the pair and their offspring. Loons fight for the chance to be parents. They stay together for the children.

The good news from our little pond masks troubling, even drastic, recent declines on some of the region’s biggest and wildest North Country lakes: Moosehead, Rangeley, Winnipesaukee, and, especially, Squam, for so many years North America’s poster lake for loons. The crisis seemed to come in the night, and it followed no logic.

On Squam, nesting pairs left the lake at the end of one successful breeding season and didn’t return the next. The loss of seven pairs from 2004 to 2005 represented nearly half of Squam’s breeding loons and reduced the lake’s overall population to the level of 30 years earlier, when Rawson Wood organized LPC’s first field season.

The problems quickly spread down the generations. In 2003, 15 chicks had survived on Squam to the end of the summer. Two years later, only four fledged; the next year only three. In 2007, a single chick survived. LPC staffers had to sift through their records all the way back to 1978 to find a year when Squam’s famous waters had produced only one chick.

Other big lakes charted similar perplexing declines. Umbagog, a sprawling lake in forested northern New Hampshire and extending into Maine, had claimed the highest concentration of nesting loons in the state. No chicks hatched there in 2007. In Maine, where an estimated 4,000 adult loons make up the largest population in the Northeast, biologists from the BioDiversity Research Institute (BRI) found that reproductive success had tanked in most breeding areas, from Down East to the Rangeley Lakes.

Lab results on Squam eggs from the worst years of the decline, 2005 through 2007, showed surprising spikes in several toxic chemicals, including high levels of two “legacy contaminants”: PCBs, which had been banned from manufacturing in 1979, and chlordane, a pesticide banned in 1988. Newer toxins, such as those found in the stain repellant PFOS and the flame retardant PBDE-99, also appeared well above levels known to affect birds.

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One Response to Call of the Wild: Loons

  1. Alice Huppert March 22, 2014 at 1:27 pm #

    Sir: I read the very interesting article about loons. Can you help? We try each summer to visit places that loons inhabit from New Hampshire to Maine– as far as Umbagog and Katahdin. We see very few and hear even less! My first experience hearing loons was a very breathtaking one (In 2005). I’d heard it during the night and asked the manager in the morning what bird it was I’d heard. He told me “those are the loons.” From there on I have been almost hypnotized by them. At a loon store in New Hampshire (near Squam Lake) I purchased a teaching CD on loons. I play it frequently, especially in the dead of winter.

    I have a question: Will it be much too early to return to SquamLake near the end of April? OR where would you suggest we visit this spring/summer to almost assure us we will hear them?

    Thank you so very much for your reply!

    Alice Huppert

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