Return to Content

Fun Facts About the Maine Coon Cat

Fun Facts About the Maine Coon Cat
0 votes, 0.00 avg. rating (0% score)

Contrary to popular myth, the Maine coon cat is not a cross between a cat and a raccoon or a domestic cat and a bobcat.

The Maine coon’s closest relative may be the Norwegian forest cat, lending credence to the theory that the first coon cats came to Maine on Viking ships.

The Maine coon was designated the state cat in 1985, making Maine the only state with an official domestic-cat breed. (Massachusetts’ state cat is the tabby, while Maryland’s is the calico; both are coat-color patterns.)

The Maine coon’s tufted ears and paws, water-resistant coat, and long, bushy tail are thought to be adaptations to the area’s cold, harsh climate.

The most romantic legend about the origins of the Maine coon involves Captain Samuel Clough’s plan to smuggle Marie Antoinette to coastal Maine, ahead of the guillotine. Supposedly, her long-haired cats did arrive here, where they mated with the hardy local feline stock to produce the Maine coon.

The Maine coon was America’s earliest indigenous show cat, first listed in cat-show records in 1861.

When breeders began importing the more exotic Persian cats around 1900, Maine coons fell out of favor.

A brown tabby Maine coon named Cosey won “Best in Show” at the first National Cat Show in 1895 at Madison Square Garden.

Expensive purrs: Expect to pay around $700 for a family pet, $1,000 for a breeding female, and $1,500-$2,500 for a stud.

Tags: ,

Sign-up for Yankee Magazine's FREE enewsletter!

and get a free digital issue, plus 30% off in the Yankee Store

Your New England Minute
Yankee Recipe Box
Yankee Exclusive Offers
Great Yankee Giveaway
Yankee's Travel Exclusives Newsletter

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Comments maybe edited for length and clarity.

yankee-giftsub-apr2014-v2