Return to Content

In Review: 'Gimme a Wimpy Burger and Paint it Red'

In Review: ‘Gimme a Wimpy Burger and Paint it Red’
0 votes, 0.00 avg. rating (0% score)

In diner lingo, a “splash of red noise” is tomato soup, and “burn the British” is a toasted English muffin—just the tip of the iceberg of gastronomic information you’ll discover at the endlessly fascinating Culinary Arts Museum at Johnson & Wales University. This carefully curated collection showcases the varied elements of cooking and cuisine across five centuries.

Examples of fine service pieces and cutlery include silver sandwich boxes, knife rests, and egg guillotines–all just one room away from still-life images of the humble early New England kitchen, the center of the home (where many families slept, too), its glowing hearth filled with hanging cast-iron pots. Another exhibit highlights the role of the celebrity chef in our lives, from the great Antonin Careme (who cooked for Napoleon and the Rothschilds) to New England’s own Julia Child. The beauty of food is celebrated, too, in an exhibit displaying wares such as intricate wedding cakes, colorful fruit-box logos, and delicately scribed menus from elegant steamship journeys and grand hotels.

Oh yeah, that red Wimpy? Just your basic burger with ketchup: like the diner, a New England invention (although Louis’ Lunch still doesn’t approve of condiments), and a great contribution to the history and culture this museum so painstakingly preserves.

Culinary Arts Museum, 315 Harborside Blvd., Providence, RI. 401-598-2805; culinary.org

Tags:

Sign-up for Yankee Magazine's FREE enewsletter!

and get a free digital issue, plus 30% off in the Yankee Store

Your New England Minute
Yankee Recipe Box
Yankee Exclusive Offers
Great Yankee Giveaway
Yankee's Travel Exclusives Newsletter

One Response to In Review: ‘Gimme a Wimpy Burger and Paint it Red’

  1. Mary Stone October 7, 2010 at 2:54 pm #

    I read the Farmhouse White Bread recipe…why don’t I have to let the rolls rise before putting in the oven like the loaves? Or do I let the rolls rise first and then put them in the hot oven? It sounds like a delicious recipe! Please let me know as I would like to try them this weekend. Thank you, Annie B. Copps. Mary Stone

Leave a Reply

Comments maybe edited for length and clarity.