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Homemade Foods of Family and Friends

Homemade Foods of Family and Friends
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I’ve been in the food business for a long time. I started what’s now my career — I had no idea I would ever have a career outside of the home, but that, as I’m wont to write, is another story for another time — in professional kitchens as a cook. I worked with some incredible talent. I went on to work in the international public-health arena for a bit, and for the last 10 years I’ve been a food journalist. I tell you this because I’ve cooked and dined around the world and have had so many extraordinary meals. I love to cook, but lately I’ve been digging the homemade foods of my family and friends. And I’ve decided to squeeze those recipes out of them and share them with you. They’re not fancy-pants, but they are satisfying. Some will come to you easily, in that my friends say, “Sure… here’s the recipe.” Most say, “Oh it’s so easy, you don’t want that.” Or, they list most of the ingredients but accidentally (or perhaps on purpose) leave a few steps out, like my friend Patty, whose “gravy” I’ve been trying to make for years. She said she’d make it with me one of these days, so fingers crossed, I’ll be able to share it.

I’d like to know some of your favorites, too — who knows, they might end up here. Also, as avid readers of Yankee magazine, you know we have a column called “Best Cook in Town.” We’re always looking for an amateur cook who has some specialties that knock your socks off. If you know of someone in your community (again, an amateur), let me know his or her story and what his or her specialty is. The more information you can provide the better. Send your recipes and “Best Cook” nominations to me at anniec@yankeepub.com.

This is my friend Siobhan’s Irish scones recipe. Siobhan is the real deal, a Dubliner with a pixie’s spirit. I didn’t “edit” this — I want you to get these recipes the way they come to me.

Oh, by the way, once baked and slightly cooled, slather a good amount of your best butter on these scones (and jam too, if you like).

5 cups self-rising flour
1 cup sugar
pinch salt
2 sticks butter
raisins
6 eggs
enough milk to make a moist batter

Heat oven to 400 degrees. Place dry ingredients in a bowl. Cut up butter and add to mixture. Add raisins. Add eggs and milk. Mix until batter is of a moist consistency. Roll out dough to half-inch thickness. Cut into circle or square shapes. Place on nonstick foil on a cookie sheet. Bake 12 to 15 minutes. Enjoy!

Please Note: This article was accurate at the time of publication. When planning a trip, please confirm details by directly contacting any company or establishment you intend to visit.

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