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Home Projects: Storage Space

Home Projects: Storage Space
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When the Hallee family moved into their 1950s cape in Portland, Maine, the lack of storage space was an issue that needed to be addressed.



Ken; his wife, Lisa; and their young daughter, Emma, live in a cozy two-bedroom home where “storage has always been an issue,” Ken says, and no more so than in the master bedroom, where one small closet meant that there was room for Lisa’s clothes but not Ken’s. Even worse, the room’s two slanted walls made bringing in a dresser “impossible.”

But then, two years ago, during a gutting of the upstairs bathroom, the Hallees noticed a peculiar thing: The elimination of that room’s knee walls revealed a potential storage area that ran 4 feet deep and, at its tallest point, 4 feet high. Suddenly those slanted walls weren’t such a liability. “We figured we could do the same thing in the bedroom,” recalls Ken. “So when the bathroom was done, we said, ‘Let’s keep going.’ ”

PROCESS

After debating whether to create just two large storage spaces, the Hallee family opted for a design that featured sectioned-off areas, with a few open-faced spots for book shelving and a television. Ken knocked out the room’s two 12-foot-long knee walls, reframed both eaves, and then Sheetrocked the studded walls. Within each space, he restored the home’s original wide-pine-board floors and then matched their color to the walls’ eggshell white.

The Hallees aren’t big fans of ornate home design–”we’re less-is-more kind of people,” says Ken–and the look of these storage spaces reflects that. The trim is simple 3-inch-wide pine; the top runner is a 12-foot board with standard three-quarter-inch molding.

Perhaps the greatest design flourishes in the new space are the five double-hinged doors, which Ken fashioned out of ready-made sheets of wainscoting, trimmed with 3-inch pine, for a “cottage-style” look.

Ken also installed a very practical extra electrical outlet behind the television space, eliminating the look of unsightly wires. The shelving itself comprises five 8-inch-wide boards, which can be removed easily to create an all-purpose cubbyhole.

Most important of all, Ken now has a home for his shirts, shoes, and sweaters, neatly organized on removable wire racks.

WHAT DO YOU LIKE MOST?

That’s simple: Ken doesn’t have to leave his bedroom to retrieve his clothes. “Before this, we had just two little closets for three people,” Ken says. “It wasn’t working.”

Please Note: This article was accurate at the time of publication. When planning a trip, please confirm details by directly contacting any company or establishment you intend to visit.

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