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Yankee Magazine's March/April Issue Honors Spring Traditions, Both Old and New

Yankee Magazine’s March/April Issue Honors Spring Traditions, Both Old and New
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DUBLIN, New Hampshire (February 17, 2011) — Yankee Magazine’s March/April 2011 issue, on newsstands March 1, 2011, bids farewell to winter cold and welcomes springtime warmth and growth. It features time-honored rituals of the season — maple festivals, swan boat rides, flower shows, book fairs, spring skiing, and more — traditions passed from generation to generation, much like the soon-to-be cherished family heirlooms created by New England’s finest artisans and craftspeople, also highlighted in Yankee’s current issue.

“This issue invites you to revisit the spring rituals passed down from family to family,” says editor Mel Allen. “Whether it’s celebrating the transformation of maple sap to tongue-tickling syrup, or the simple childlike pleasure of gliding across a pond in a swan boat, these timeless traditions call us back to roots and memories. They tie us to the landscape and to a season more emphatically than any calendar does. All of these stories we hope will bring you back issue after issue as we continue to link the past, present, and future of New England.”

Inside the Issue

Feature Stories

“Chasing Spring” — by Annie Graves (page 78): As the earth warms, glorious color and celebrations of renewal trace the arc of the season.

“Goodbye to Winter” — by Rebecca Rideout (page 86): Pause, linger a moment, and say a proper farewell to the deep satisfaction of indoor comforts.

“Holy Day in the Nation” — by Ian Aldrich (page 88): For the Fenway faithful, the Red Sox home opener is a sacred event second to none.

“The Big Question” — interviewed by Jim Collins (page 92): Red Sox rookie Daniel Nava tells readers how it felt to make history with his first major-league hit.

“The Memory Keeper” — by Justin Shatwell (page 96): The lives of child mill workers in Winchendon, Massachusetts, photographed a century ago by Lewis Hine, were all but forgotten — until Joe Manning went looking for “the most beautiful girl in American history.”

The Guide

In the Travel section’s main feature, “Rites of Passage” (page 40), Yankee staff writers and contributors share their favorite traditions that mark the change of season in New England.

In the Home section’s main feature, “The New New England Heirlooms,” by Christie Matheson (page 52), Yankee highlights some of the region’s most exceptional artisans, who are creating prized masterpieces, guaranteed to be passed down from generation to generation. In “Inspired Ideas” (page 62), Terry John Woods shows readers how to make a rustic-looking coatrack out of old wooden shoe forms. And in Yankee’s “Antiques & Collectibles” column (page 64), Catherine Riedel writes about Plainville, Massachusetts’ Whiting & Davis, makers of mesh purses, which became genuine Art Deco sensations in the early 20th century.

In the Food section, Lisa Ekus-Saffer, who runs a media agency promoting chefs and their cookbooks, entertains her foodie friends at her 18th-century farmhouse (“Recipe for Entertaining,” page 66). Her guests feast on “Cumin- and Lemon-Scented Lamb Lollipops with Skordalia”; “Cold Asparagus Soup with Local Chevre”; “Wild-Salmon Roulades”; “Potato, Sorrel & Egg Salad”; and “Rhubarb-and-Mango Compote.” This issue’s “Best Cook in Town” (page 74) is Vermonter Marcia Maynard, who makes recipes inspired by her passion for maple sugaring. She and her husband run Cabot Hills Maple and sell certified organic maple syrup.

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