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Ask Brewski: What's the Best Bowl for a Puppy?

Puppy BowlMy puppy chewed up his plastic food bowl, so I have to get a new one. What kind should I look for?

Oh, these youngsters! Veterinarians say that stainless-steel food bowls are healthier for pets than plastic bowls, especially in the summer. Plastic bowls tend to get tiny scratches, where bacteria can hide. Stainless steel is easier to clean, too—and practically indestructible!


Sometimes when I’m playing with my kitty, she seems to be really enjoying it, but then all of a sudden she starts attacking me! What should I do?

I’ve had a few run-ins with touchy felines myself over the years! Your kitty may just get tired of being petted and is trying to tell you in the fastest way she knows. To prevent an attack, try petting just her head; don’t pet her tummy or the rest of her body. See how long you can pet her head before she gets irritated, and then stay below that time period. (This way, you won’t give her a chance to practice her “bad” behavior.) To build up her tolerance, try rewarding her with treats each time she lets you pet her a little longer than before. Or here’s another way to make friends with your kitty: Instead of petting her all the time, pick up a feather wand or another one of her favorite toys and play with her – cats love to chase things! To learn more, go to:

My white cat loves to sun herself. Can she get sunburned?

Yes! Too much sun can irritate your kitty’s skin; her ear tips and cheeks may turn red and tender. Dogs who have short fur and fair skin also tend to get sunburned on their noses and bellies. To prevent sunburn, apply waterproof sunscreen or sunblock to these delicate areas; ask your veterinarian to recommend a brand that’s safe for your pet’s skin (and one that won’t harm her if she licks it off). Or, better yet, stay inside and invent some new games to play on sunny days!

My 4-month-old puppy chews and bites everything! Will she grow out of it?

Puppies love to chew on things, even people! Most puppies chew because their adult teeth coming in, which can sometimes be uncomfortable for them. Try to keep your puppy busy by giving her enough items that are “good” to chew, such as toys and treats that your veterinarian approves. (Make sure you keep “people food,” garbage, household products, plants, shoes, and electrical cords tucked away or covered, out of your puppy’s reach.) If your puppy is chewing on you, discourage her gently, then give her an item that’s okay to chew. Most puppies do grow out of their chewing eventually, but it does take some training along the way! To learn more, visit:

Answers presented here are offered only as a source of background information. For specific diagnostic, treatment, and behavioral advice, be sure to consult your veterinarian.

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