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Trees: Five New England Favorites

This very large and beautiful horse chestnut was planted by one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence, William Whipple, upon his return from Philadelphia in 1776.

Where: On the lawn of the Moffatt-Ladd House on Market Street, Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

“The Forest Primeval”

Along the Elwell Trail at Paradise Point Nature Center is a stand of giant hemlocks that began their lives in the 17th century, well before Longfellow wrote of “the murmuring pines and the hemlocks” in “Evangeline.”

Where: Paradise Point Nature Center, North Shore Road, East Hebron, New Hampshire. 603-744-3516.

The Endicott Pear

The oldest living fruit tree in the United States has blossomed and borne fruit for more than 300 years. In 1964 vandals cut off its branches, but the tree was saved by grafting.

Where: On Endicott Street, behind the Sylvania Plant in Danvers, Massachusetts. Take exit 24 off Route 128.

“Tree at my window, window tree …”

From 1900 to 1909 Robert Frost lived on a farm in Derry, New Hampshire. He once wrote, “I might say the core of all my writing was probably the first five years I had there.” His children may have played by this magnificent maple near the barn.

Where: Frost Farm, 2 miles south of Derry Circle on Route 28. 603-432-3091.

The Sculptor’s Honey Locust

This tree stands in front of the house where famed sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens lived. It was planted by Saint-Gaudens in 1886 and is the largest honey locust in New Hampshire.

Where: Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, Cornish. Take I-89 to exit 20, drive south on Route 12A. 603-675-2175.

The Castine Elms

Please Note: This information was accurate at the time of publication. When planning a trip, please confirm details by directly contacting any company or establishment you intend to visit.

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One Response to Trees: Five New England Favorites

  1. thomas tarr March 12, 2014 at 10:03 pm #

    The parkhurst elm is no longer there. Sad.

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