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Christmas Shopping in Portland, Maine | Last-Minute Gifts from the Old Port

It’s seafood that I’m thinking about as I tool down Commercial Street on my way to the Old Port to do some last minute gift buying. Not the lobster roll I crave in summertime, but something more filling— scallops, haddock, perhaps a steaming bowl of chowder. That decision will have to wait for a few hours, though, as my first priority is to finish my Christmas shopping in Portland, Maine.

Longfellow Monument

Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
Even the Henry Wadsworth Longfellow Monument, located in Portland’s Longfellow Square, gets in the holiday spirit.

When I step out of my car after tucking it into the last available slot on Dana Street, one thing becomes immediately apparent—I’m not wearing the right shoes. The storm that blew through the region two days before—dumping more than a foot of snow on the city—has work crews scurrying to relocate piles of the once white, fluffy stuff, and they’re not done yet. The cobblestone sidewalks are studded with clumps of rock salt, and waves of slush ripple over the side streets and alleyways.

A foot of snow made getting around Portland a bit slower than normal, but it didn't deter fellow shoppers.

Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
A foot of snow made getting around Portland a bit slower than normal, but it didn’t deter fellow shoppers.

This is going to slow me down and I’ll have to concentrate my efforts if I want to adhere to the two-hour parking limit. (I learned my lesson about parking violations on my trip to Kittery Point.) Not to be deterred, I carefully pick my way up to Fore Street and hook a left onto Exchange—the Old Port’s main drag of eclectic shops and restaurants and the ideal spot to find gifts for everyone on my Christmas list.

3-dont-panic
Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
I have a lot to accomplish, but before I get started, a sign catches my eye: “Maine Potato Donuts.” That’s different. Envisioning Yankee’s recipe for potato-based gingerbread puffs, I go to investigate. Sliding into a corner chair, cinnamon-sugar donut in front of me, I learn that The Holy Donut has garnered a lot of recognition for using real Maine mashed potatoes in their batter. The result is a thick, moist donut that practically melts in my mouth. The flood of light rolling through the windows, dancing over the exposed brick walls, along with the scent of dough puffing in the fryer lulls me into sitting longer than I should. Reluctantly, I force myself to leave before sampling any more of their offerings, but my next trip to Portland is sure to include a dark chocolate sea salt donut.

The Holy Donut offers Maine potato donuts, and their atmosphere screams Portland.

Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
The Holy Donut offers Maine potato donuts, and their atmosphere screams Portland.

Shops carrying locally-made goods and imported jewelry, art galleries, and trendy boutiques squeeze into the long, narrow, historic brick buildings that line either side of Exchange Street. I peruse chunky, silver jewelry at SeVende Imports, and while it’s all funky and unique, I leave empty-handed, unable to choose just one bracelet. Pottery swirled with colorful glazes beckons from Edgecomb Potters, whose selection of products also includes jewelry and lighting. Ten Thousand Villages—one of the world’s oldest and largest fair trade organizations—draws me in with its colorful display of scarves and bags. Their wares are beautiful; their mission admirable, but I’m hoping to find gifts made in New England, so I push on.

Door Wreath

It’s the fire-engine red door at Lisa Marie’s–Made in Maine that catches my attention, or more specifically, the signs that pepper said door: “Buy Local,” “gr8 Portland, ME,” and the handwritten one I can’t resist, “Friendly Dog Inside.” Roxy, possibly the sweetest rescue dog I’ve ever met, escorts me around the store, approving of the growing pile of gifts cradled in my arms by pushing her soft snout into the side of my leg. Out of respect for the artisans selling their goods, the owners request that photos not be taken, so I can’t show you all of the wonderful stuff encased in this shop. You’ll just have to check it out for yourself.

Lisa-Marie's Made in Maine

Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
Roxy greets customers at Lisa-Marie’s Made in Maine.

The time is ticking on the meter, but I can’t leave Exchange Street without visiting my absolute favorite store in Portland, Maine—Abacus. Two floors of distinctive jewelry, art, and accessories for the home make this the perfect place to shop for the person who has everything. Be sure to venture downstairs to peruse their unusual selection of metal sculptures. On the other end of Exchange Street, the Gourmutt Beastro & Barkery offers treats, pawstries and foods that are made to order for your favorite furry friend.

The Gourmut

Need a treat for your favorite furry friend? Stop in at the Gourmutt Beastro & Barkery.

As I drive around Portland, skimming sheets of snow off the banks that push into the winding streets, looking for a new parking spot and trying to decide where to grab a bite to eat, I spy something I’m not expecting—Walter’s Restaurant is open for lunch. Back when Jim and I lived in the greater Portland area, and Walter’s was located on Exchange Street, it was our restaurant of choice for all special occasions. When it comes to culinary notoriety, Fore Street and Hugo’s may garner most of the attention—and deservedly so—but in my opinion, Walter’s is a worthy contender. The day’s special (slices of rare seared tuna circled by delicately seasoned edamame, rice, and cashews) did not disappoint.

Walter's Restaurant

Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
Stop in at Walter’s Restaurant for a truly unique lunch.

With an eye on the Time and Temperature Building, I head back to Fore Street to pop in and out of a few more shops and gather more gifts before the sun goes down. I’d love to stay to see the twinkling lights that coil through the trees come to life against the city backdrop or step inside Bull Feeney’s or Brian Boru’s for an hour or so, but I’ve accomplished what I’ve come to do. I’ve finished my Christmas shopping in Portland, Maine, and now it’s time to head home.

Brian Boru Pub

Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
Brian Boru Public House offers comfort food in a cozy pub atmosphere.

Don't Miss Arrow Best of New England: Best Restaurants in Portland, Maine
Recipe: Potato-Based Gingerbread Puffs

Please Note: This article was accurate at the time of publication. When planning a trip, please confirm details by directly contacting any company or establishment you intend to visit.

Brenda Darroch

Author:

Brenda Darroch

Biography:

Digital Editor Brenda Darroch creates and manages content for YankeeMagazine.com, YankeeFoliage.com, e-newsletters, and Yankee's search and social media initiatives. Follow Brenda Darroch on !
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