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Fall Flowers and Plants | Seven Seasonal Ways to Display Your Favorite Fall Flowers and Plants

Fall Flowers and Plants | Seven Seasonal Ways to Display Your Favorite Fall Flowers and Plants
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Get the most out of your fall flowers, even after the first frost by displaying them in fun and innovative ways throughout November and beyond. Here are seven seasonal ideas to get you started.

Hardy Mums
Photo/Art by Brenda Darroch
Mums can remain outside as long as daytime temperatures stay above freezing.

Mums: Bring in potted mums before autumn night frosts. Display on a plant stand or end table. The plants may be moved back outside during the day as long as daytime temperatures stay above freezing. If the potted mums are too large to easily move inside, simply cover with old sheets or pillowcases at night when a frost is expected, and remove the sheets when the sun warms the air in the morning.

Kale: These interesting purplish clusters may be brought indoors long after the fall and displayed indefinitely in cool , sunny spots.

Bittersweet VineBittersweet: Bittersweet is an invasive berry vine that — although pretty — can be messy due to the soft make up of the berries when used in indoor flower arrangements.  However, bittersweet is right at home in outdoor arrangements such as in urns, baskets and woven around twig wreaths or fences. Read more about the beautiful bittersweet vine.

gourd planterFlower Arrangement in a Pumpkin: Hollow out a leftover Halloween pumpkin or gourd and insert a small vase. Fill the vase ¾ full with water.  Snip clusters of chrysanthemums to add to the vase.  For added fall appeal accent with curly willow twigs or bright orange Chinese lantern plants.
Get instructions to display flowers in a pumpkin.

Nature in a Bowl: The next time you go for a walk, be on the lookout for fallen pine cones, chestnuts, dry milkweed pods, rosehips and wayward acorns. Fill a basket with a collection of these plant gifts from nature and display on a coffee table. For added scent appeal, toss a few cinnamon sticks and cloves into the mix.

Dried Hydrangeas: Hydrangeas dry quickly and retain their structure.  When dry, they take on a brownish hue perfect for fall décor. They look lovely in a rustic pitcher or large pottery vase, and once thoroughly dry can be used year after year.

Fall Corn Husks (user submitted)
Photo/Art by J. Emily Bandru
Tie corn husks together with burlap, hemp string or raffia.
 

Corn Husks and Indian Corn: Cut groupings of corn husks to fit in a large vase for a centerpiece display. Tie the husks together with burlap, hemp string or raffia.  Use floral wire to twist colorful ears of dried Indian corn on to the husk cluster.

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Shelley Wigglesworth

Author:

Shelley Wigglesworth

Biography:

Shelley (Fleming) Wigglesworth is an award-winning freelance journalist from Maine specializing in maritime topics and the commercial fishing industry. She is also a certified Maine Master Gardener who writes gardening articles on a regular basis for Yankee Magazine. Her work can be found in the following publications: The York County Coast Star, Portsmouth Herald, Bangor Daily News, Yankee Magazine (online), National Fisherman Magazine, Commercial Fisheries News, Tourist News, Points East Magazine, Coastal Angler and The Maine Lobstermen's Association’s “Landings.” Follow Shelley on Facebook.
Updated Monday, October 29th, 2012

4 Responses to Fall Flowers and Plants | Seven Seasonal Ways to Display Your Favorite Fall Flowers and Plants

  1. Jamie S. October 29, 2012 at 7:13 pm #

    Thank you for sharing these tips. Maintaining your garden in the fall is one of the toughest things in gardening that are as the weather can be pretty unpredictable. But despite the hard work it always pleases me to see the outcome. Especially because the fall garden shines with many beautiful colours. I never thought using bittersweet for the door decorations – I too thought it was too messy, so I´m glad I found this. It creates simple, but very original decoration.

  2. Shelley Wigglesworth October 29, 2012 at 7:25 pm #

    Jamie-Thank you so much for reading! Have fun decorating! ~ Shelley

  3. Gardening Blog December 16, 2012 at 5:25 am #

    Are you able to have a grass disease? I keep getting weird mounds of garden soil
    sprouting up and I am not sure what is causing it, do you think
    a garden care expert would know?

    • Shelley Wigglesworth January 9, 2013 at 3:52 pm #

      If you have mounds of dirt appearing-it sounds like you may have moles and/or voles tunneling under your lawn. Though it may be unsightly, these rodents actually aerate the lawn in their search for grubs to eat under the lawn.

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