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Turkey Stock / Turkey and Wild Rice Soup

Turkey Stock / Turkey and Wild Rice Soup
5 votes, 4.80 avg. rating (93% score)
by in Nov 2006

Total Time: 20

Yield: 9 cups of soup

The addition of cream transforms the Turkey and Wild Rice Soup into a more filling meal. The flavors continue to develop, making the soup even better the next day. I love the flavor of wild rice, but 2 cups of cooked white rice works well, too.

Ingredients:

  • Carcass of a roasted turkey
  • 2 carrots, chopped
  • 2 medium-size onions, chopped
  • 3 stalks celery with leaves, chopped
  • 1/2 cup fresh parsley, stems included
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 bay leaf
  • 1 teaspoon peppercorns

Instructions:

Remove legs, thighs, wings, and all of the stuffing from carcass. Remove any meat still on bones (chop and refrigerate for use in soup recipe). Place carcass, bones, and remaining ingredients in a stockpot (you may have to crack the bones to fit your pot). Add just enough cold water to cover bones by 1 inch. Bring mixture to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer 4 hours, skimming surface frequently and discarding any white foam that forms on the surface. Remove from heat and cool.

Strain stock through a cheesecloth-lined colander or a fine sieve into a large bowl; discard bones, vegetables, and seasonings. Cool, then cover and refrigerate overnight. Once stock has cooled sufficiently for fat to solidify, remove and discard fat from top before using. Yield: about 4 quarts

Turkey and Wild Rice Soup

Ingredients:

  • 1/2 cup butter
  • 2 stalks celery, thinly sliced
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 1/3 cup all-purpose flour
  • 1-1/2 quarts Turkey Stock (or canned chicken broth)
  • 1 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 2 cups cooked chopped turkey
  • 2 cups cooked wild rice
  • 1 cup heavy cream
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

Instructions:

In a Dutch oven or stockpot, melt butter. Add celery, carrots, and onion; cook, stirring constantly, over medium heat 5 minutes or until vegetables are crisp-tender. Stir in flour and cook, stirring constantly, 5 minutes. Add turkey stock and bring mixture to a boil.

Add salt and pepper; reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Add turkey, rice, cream, and parsley; cook until soup is thoroughly heated–do not boil.
Updated Friday, November 10th, 2006
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4 Responses to Turkey Stock / Turkey and Wild Rice Soup

  1. Caroline Robinson December 6, 2006 at 12:50 pm #

    I made this soup (with chicken instead) for a church pot luck. It was fantastic! The cream gives it a nice touch.

  2. Judi Goddard January 24, 2007 at 8:11 pm #

    This was absolutely excellent. I used fresh thyme in place of the parsley and it was outstanding! I don’t make too many soups but this I will make again.

  3. yvette carling November 27, 2011 at 5:08 pm #

    This is the third time I have made this soup and it is terrific from the very first day! If you prefer a lighter-calorie version, you can substitute half of the butter for a lighter “heart-smart” butter. Also, you can substitute half-and-half for the heavy cream, or part of it being milk. It is quite difficult to mess it up, because the stock is so hearty. Dairy-free would also be fine as well. Best advice, take time to make the stock and really let it simmer for 5 hours. It’s all very easy and rewarding. Enjoy. It also freezes well and is a perfect antidote for a chilly, rainy day.

  4. yvette carling February 10, 2013 at 11:04 am #

    Annually, on Thanksgiving night, the turkey carcass gets tucked into my freezer until a chilly weekend presents. It then becomes the star ingredient for this heartwarming & satisfying soup.

    The 2-day process of this recipe — which is not actually time-consuming, but requires one to mind the stove — is a cozy ritual.

    When ready, it is a joy to give this nourishing gift made with love to the Thanksgiving Day host!

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